Data for download – species and traits

  1. Status and purpose of the Pladias Database

    The Pladias Database contains critically revised data on the Czech flora and vegetation managed by the Department of Botany and Zoology, Faculty of Science, Masaryk University (MU) and the Institute of Botany, The Czech Academy of Sciences (IBOT), including data files provided by other institutions or individuals (hereafter „providers“). Its aim is to promote the use of data on plant diversity in the Czech Republic for the purposes of scientific research, education, nature conservation and environmental assessment.The decisions about the concept of the database, inclusion of specific data files and data provision are made by the Management Board of the Pladias Database (hereafter „Governing Board“, Appendix 1), which follows these Rules and respects the interests and rights of the individual providers.

  2. Storing data in the Pladias Database

    The decisions about including particular data files in the database are taken by the Governing Board. The provider is responsible for obtaining permission to transmit data to the Pladias Database from any other parties that may have property or intellectual rights to these data or their subsets. . The provider of each data set specifies to what extent and under what conditions the data may be used or provided to third parties. . The Governing Board favours the widest possible public availability of data, while respecting the rights of providers to restrict public access to their data and complying with the conditions of use set by the providers.

  3. Providing data from the Pladias Database

    The Pladias Database contains
    1. public data that are freely available and can be viewed or downloaded from the Pladias website without registration
    2. public data that are freely available but can only be viewed or downloaded from the Pladias website after registration and login
    3. non-public data

    Public data (both freely available and available after registration) can be used for basic and applied scientific research, teaching, nature conservation and environmental assessment. Their potential use for commercial purposes is subject to approval by the Governing Board or the provider of particular data subsets. The use of data for the purposes of funded projects or expert reports by governmental, educational and research institutions, and NGOs is not considered commerce.

    Non-public data can be provided upon request sent by e-mail to members of the Management Board (Appendix 1). The application must contain a delimitation of the extent of the data required, description of the purpose of their use and specification of the final product (e.g. publication, research report or educational presentation). If the expected use of the data assumes cooperation of several people, a nominal list is added to the application. The decision about the provision of data on species traits and conditions for their use for a given purpose is made by their provider or, in the case of trait data owned by MU or IBOT, or species distribution data, by the Governing Board.

  4. Responsibilities of Pladias Database users

    When using data from the Pladias Database (including distribution maps) in publications, research reports or for teaching and public presentations, the user specifies the data source „Pladias – A Database of Czech Flora and Vegetation, www.pladias.org“, or (especially in the scientific literature) cites the article with a basic description of the database (after it is published). When using species distribution data, the user also cites the article about the species distribution database (after it is published). When using specific plant trait data or species lists the user also cites the original sources referred to in the Pladias Database. When using texts or images that the Pladias Database has taken from published sources (especially Flora of the Czech Republic, Vegetation of the Czech Republic, Phytocartographic Syntheses of the Czech Republic and articles with species distribution maps published in the journal Preslia), the user cites only the published sources. When using images of plants or vegetation types from the Pladias Database website the user quotes the author of the image and the source „www.pladias.org“.

Public or non-public data obtained from the Pladias Database must not to be transferred to other institutions or persons, or posted on the Internet. The exception is sharing them with colleagues working on a project that uses specific data (in the case of non-public data after prior approval by the provider or by the Governing Board).

The user of data obtained from the Pladias Database helps to improve the quality of the database by reporting any detected errors in the data to the Governing Board or the provider of the particular data file.


Appendix 1 to the Pladias Database Management and Access Rules
The Governing Board of the Pladias Database, established 1 January 2016, has the following composition

  • Jiří Danihelka, danihel@sci.muni.cz, Department of Botany and Zoology, Faculty of Science, Masaryk University and Institute of Botany, The Czech Academy of Sciences
  • Milan Chytrý, chytry@sci.muni.cz, Department of Botany and Zoology, Faculty of Science, Masaryk University
  • Zdeněk Kaplan, zdenek.kaplan@ibot.cas.cz, Institute of Botany, The Czech Academy of Sciences
  • Petr Pyšek, pysek@ibot.cas.cz, Institute of Botany, The Czech Academy of Sciences
  • Jan Wild, jan.wild@ibot.cas.cz, Institute of Botany, The Czech Academy of Sciences

The checklist of vascular plants of the Czech Republic (Danihelka et al. 2012) includes 3557 species (plus 194 additional subspecies) and 609 (plus 13 additional nothospecies) hybrids. Of these, 2256 species are native, 464 naturalized (228 archaeophytes and 236 neophytes) and 837 casual aliens. Further, 324 cultivated taxa of different ranks are listed.

Data source and citation

Danihelka J., Chrtek J. Jr. & Kaplan Z. (2012): Checklist of vascular plants of the Czech Republic. – Preslia 84: 647–811.

The checklist includes 4626 taxa of vascular plants including hybrids, cultivated plants and aggregates that were used in the Key to the flora of the Czech Republic (Kubát et al. 2002).

Data source and citation

Kubát K., Hrouda L., Chrtek J. jun, Kaplan Z., Kirschner J. & Štěpánek J. (eds) (2002): Klíč ke květeně České republiky [Key to the flora of the Czech Republic]. – Academia, Praha.

The Catalogue includes alien (non-native) taxa of vascular plants, i.e. those that arrived in the country as result of intentional or unintentional introduction by human activity. They are divided based on their residence time (archaeophytes introduced before the end of the Medieval vs neophytes introduced in the Modern Period).

Alien taxa are divided into three categories reflecting their position in the invasion process. Taxa that only reproduce occasionally in the Czech Republic, do not form self-replacing populations, and rely on repeated introductions for their persistence are termed casuals. Naturalized taxa are alien plants that reproduce in the wild and sustain populations over many life cycles without direct intervention by humans (or in spite of human intervention). Invasive plants are naturalized plants that produce reproductive offspring, often in very large numbers, at considerable distances from parent plants and thus have the potential to spread over a considerable area.

The Catalogue also contains other data about alien taxa, such as their geographic origin and introduction pathways.

Data source and citation

Pyšek P., Danihelka J., Sádlo J., Chrtek J. Jr., Chytrý M., Jarošík V., Kaplan Z., Krahulec F., Moravcová L., Pergl J., Štajerová K. & Tichý L. (2012): Catalogue of alien plants of the Czech Republic (2nd edition): checklist update, taxonomic diversity and invasion patterns. – Preslia 84: 155–255.

Data on taxon occurrence in habitats of the Czech Republic based on the analysis of vegetationplots from the Czech National Phytosociological Database (Chytrý & Rafajová 2003) and its expert revision and completion based on the literature and field experience, especially for rare and taxonomically problematic taxa. The classification recognizes 88 basic habitats aggregated to 13 broader habitats that are defined by Sádlo et al. (2007: Appendix 1):

  • 1 Vegetation of cliffs, screes and walls
    • 1A Calcareous cliffs
    • 1B Siliceous cliffs and block fields
    • 1C Walls
    • 1D Mobile calcareous screes
  • 2 Alpine and subalpine grasslands
    • 2A Alpine grasslands on siliceous bedrock
    • 2B Subalpine tall-forb and tall-grass vegetation
  • 3 Aquatic vegetation
    • 3A Macrophytic vegetation of eutrophic and mesotrophic still waters
    • 3B Macrophytic vegetation of water streams
    • 3C Macrophytic vegetation of oligotrophic lakes and pools
  • 4 Wetland and riverine herbaceous vegetation
    • 4A Reed-beds of eutrophic still waters
    • 4B Halophilous reed and sedge beds
    • 4C Eutrophic vegetation of muddy substrata
    • 4D Riverine reed vegetation
    • 4E Reed vegetation of brooks
    • 4F Mesotrophic vegetation of muddy substrata
    • 4G Tall-sedge beds
    • 4H Vegetation of low annual hygrophilous herbs
    • 4I Vegetation of nitrophilous annual hygrophilous herbs
    • 4J River gravel banks
    • 4K Petasites fringes of montane brooks
    • 4L Nitrophilous herbaceous fringes of lowland rivers
  • 5 Vegetation of springs and mires
    • 5G Raised bogs
    • 5A Hard-water springs with tufa formation
    • 5B Lowland to montane soft-water springs
    • 5C Alpine and subalpine soft-water springs
    • 5D Calcareous fens
    • 5E Acidic moss-rich fens and peatland meadows
    • 5F Transitional mires
    • 5H Wet peat soils and bog hollows
  • 6 Meadows and mesic pastures
    • 6A Mesic Arrhenatherum meadows
    • 6B Montane mesic meadows
    • 6C Pastures and park grasslands
    • 6D Alluvial meadows of lowland rivers
    • 6E Wet Cirsium meadows
    • 6F Intermittently wet Molinia meadows
    • 6G Vegetation of wet disturbed soils
  • 7 Acidophilous grasslands
    • 7A Subalpine and montane acidophilous grasslands
    • 7B Submontane Nardus grasslands
  • 8 Dry grasslands
    • 8A Hercynian dry grasslands on rock outcrops
    • 8B Submediterranean dry grasslands on rock outcrops
    • 8C Narow-leaved sub-continental steppes
    • 8D Broad-leaved dry grasslands
    • 8E Acidophilous dry grasslands
    • 8F Thermophilous forest fringe vegetation
  • 9 Sand grasslands and rock-outcrop vegetation
    • 9B Open vegetation of acidic sands
    • 9C Festuca grasslands on acidic sands
    • 9D Pannonian sand steppes
    • 9E Acidophilous vegetation of spring therophytes and succulents
    • 9F Basiphilous vegetation of spring therophytes and succulents
  • 10 Saline vegetation
    • 10G Continental vegetation of annual halophilous grasses
    • 10H Inland vegetation of succulent halophytes
    • 10I Inland saline meadows
    • 10J Saline steppes
  • 11 Heathlands and scrub
    • 11A Dry lowland to subalpine heathlands
    • 11D Subalpine acidophilous Pinus mugo scrub
    • 11H Subalpine deciduous scrub
    • 11I Willow carrs
    • 11J Willow galleries of loamy and sandy river banks
    • 11L Tall mesic and xeric shrub
    • 11N Low xeric scrub
    • 11R Scrub and pioneer woodland of forests clearings
  • 12 Forests
    • 12L Boreo-continental pine forests
    • 12O Peri-Alpidic pine forests
    • 12A Alder carrs
    • 12B Alluvial forests
    • 12C Oak-hornbeam forests
    • 12D Ravine forests
    • 12E Herb-rich beech forests
    • 12F Limestone beech forests
    • 12G Acidophilous beech forests
    • 12H Peri-Alpidic basiphilous thermophilous oak forests
    • 12I Sub-continental thermophilous oak forests
    • 12J Acidophilous thermophilous oak forests
    • 12K Acidophilous oak forests
    • 12P Peatland pine forests
    • 12Q Peatland birch forests
    • 12R Acidophilous spruce forests
    • 12S Basiphilous spruce forests
    • 12T Robinia pseudacacia plantations
    • 12U Plantations of broad-leaved non-native trees
    • 12V Picea plantations
    • 12W Pinus and Larix plantations
  • 13 Anthropogenic vegetation
    • 13A Annual vegetation of ruderal habitats
    • 13B Annual vegetation of arable land
    • 13C Annual vegetation of trampled habitats
    • 13D Perennial thermophilous ruderal vegetation
    • 13E Perennial nitrophilous herbaceous vegetation of mesic sites
    • 13F Herbaceous vegetation of forests clearings and Rubus scrub

    Taxon occurrence in each habitat is assessed on a four-degree scale:

    • 1 – occurrence – taxon can grow in the habitat, but it is not ecological optimum for this taxon,which often is rare in this habitat
    • 2 – optimum – the habitat or part of it is ecological optimumfor this taxon
    • 3 – dominant – taxon can be assigned to the previous category and at the same time frequently attains a cover above 25% in areas ≥ 10 m2 or ≥ 100 m2 in herbaceousor woody vegetation, respectively
    • 4 – constant dominant – same as for the previous category but also determines the general appearance of the habitat (e.g., Calluna vulgaris in heathlands), occurring in ≥ 40% of the localities of the habitat

    Data source and citation

    Sádlo J., Chytrý M. & Pyšek P. (2007): Regional species pools of vascular plants in habitats of the Czech Republic. – Preslia 79: 303–321.

    Further references

    Chytrý M. & Rafajová M. (2003): Czech National Phytosociological Database: basic statistics of the available vegetation-plot data. – Preslia 75: 1–15.

Indicator values are expressed on ordinal scales defined by Ellenberg et al. (1991). The values for individual taxa have been modified and extended for the Czech flora by Chytrý et al. (2018). Indicator values are provided for six factors:

Light – a scale from 1 to 9, in which higher values indicate higher requirements for light. Indicator values for trees relate to juvenile individuals growing in the herb or shrub layer.

Temperature – a scale from 1 to 9, in which higher values indicate requirements for higher temperature.

Moisture – a scale from 1 to 12, in which higher values indicate requirements for more water.

Reaction – a scale from 1 to 9, in which higher values indicate taxon affinity to more base-rich environments. In acidic environments, the value can be considered as a proxy for pH, while in near-neutral or alkaline environments it is more a proxy for calcium concentration.

Nutrients – a scale from 1 to 9, in which higher values indicate higher requirements for nitrogen or phosphorus availability, or higher primary productivity of the site.

Salinity – a scale from 0 to 9, in which higher values indicate higher tolerance to conditions with high concentration of soluble salts, especially sulphates, chlorides and carbonates of sodium, potassium, calcium and magnesium.

The dataset for download contains the variables L, T, M, R, N and S with numerical values for all taxa except parasitic epiphytes, while in the variables Lx, Tx, Mx, Rx and Nx the numerical value is replaced by “x” in generalists. In any calculations of site mean indicator values, we recommend to use the latter set of variables and consider “x” as missing values, because inclusion of generalist decreases accuracy of prediction of environmental conditions. We did not define any generalists for salinity, therefore the site mean indicator values for salinity should be calculated using the variable S; in this case it is important that the zero values are included in calculations.

Data source and citation

Chytrý M., Tichý L., Dřevojan P., Sádlo J. & Zelený D. (2018): Ellenberg-type indicator values for the Czech flora. – Preslia 90.

Further references

Ellenberg H., Weber H. E., Düll R., Wirth V., Werner W. & Paulißen D. (1991): Zeigerwerte von Pflanzen in Mitteleuropa. – Scr. Geobot. 18: 1–248.

Dispersal unit (diaspore) - download ?
Dispersal strategy - download ?

Affinity to the forest environment

?
Affinity to the forest environment in Thermophyticum - download
Affinity to the forest environment in Mesophyticum and Oreophyticum - download

Diagnostic taxa

?
Diagnostic taxa of the classes - download
Diagnostic taxa of the alliances - download
Diagnostic taxa of the associations - download

Constant taxa

?
Constant taxa of the classes - download
Constant taxa of the alliances - download
Constant taxa of the associations - download

Dominant taxa

?
Dominant taxa of the associations - download

Ecological specialization indices

?
Ecological specialization index for all vegetation types - download
Ecological specialization index for non-forest vegetation - download
Ecological specialization index for forest vegetation - download
Red List 2017 (national categories) - download ?
Red List 2017 (IUCN categories) - download ?
Legal protection - download ?
Red List 2012 - download ?

This web page uses for the attendance analysis cookies. By using this web you agree with this. More info